Maths

At St Martins we follow the Rising Stars Primary Maths Planning Framework which was written by the Devon Maths Advisory team to support schools working with the New Primary Curriculum. Below are the principles of our maths curriculum across St Martins taken from the Maths Planning Framework.

“Introduction to the Mathematics Planning Framework”

This framework has been written to provide teachers with a structure for designing learning sequences covering the content of the National Curriculum and underpinned by its aims, namely that all pupils should:

★  solve problems

★  reason mathematically

★  become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics.

The aims require children of all ages to make and justify decisions in all areas of mathematics. This requirement is at the centre of this framework, putting talk at the heart of mathematics teaching and learning. The programmes of study in the National Curriculum provide a list of content split between different domains, which vary from one year to the next. This has led to related ideas being split and placed under different headings; for example decimals are separated out from number and place value and placed within fractions (including decimals) and converting between different units is within measurement. These elements are all part of the same mathematics and they need to be brought together and connected so that learners can make sense of the mathematics and relate it to what they know and understand. This is explained in the National Curriculum as follows:

Mathematics is an interconnected subject in which pupils need to be able to move fluently between representations of mathematical ideas. The programmes of study are, by necessity, organised into apparently distinct domains, but pupils should make rich connections across mathematical ideas to develop fluency, mathematical reasoning and competence in solving increasingly sophisticated problems. They should also apply their mathematical knowledge to science and other subjects. [Page 99]Within this framework there is an expectation that connections are made between these different ways of experiencing mathematics in all areas.In the knowledge that learning mathematics involves exposing structures and making connections, this framework is built around four themes: number sense, additive reasoning, multiplicative reasoning and geometric reasoning. These themes make clear connections between areas of mathematics, encouraging children to use what they know and understand rather than treating each area of maths as separate and unconnected.

Themes

Number Sense – this theme is about understanding our number system, starting with counting numbers and building on this understanding to include negative numbers, fractions and decimals. The focus is on building an understanding of how our numbers work and fit together and includes exploring place value, comparing and ordering numbers and rounding and applying this understanding in different contexts. Understanding our number system underpins calculation, and in each year group, blocks on additive reasoning and multiplicative reasoning are usually preceded by a block on number sense which explores understanding necessary for the following calculation block.

Additive Reasoning – this theme is about all aspects of understanding addition and subtraction. The focus is on understanding addition and subtraction together and the relationship between them, and using this understanding to solve problems in different contexts, including measures and statistics. The expectation is that children of all ages appropriately choose and use number facts, understanding of place value and different methods (starting with counting and mental methods and developing into mental and written methods), explaining their decision making and justifying their solutions.

Multiplicative Reasoning – this theme is about all aspects of understanding multiplication and division including fractions. The focus is on understanding multiplication and division together and the relationship between them, clearly connecting to this an understanding of fractions both as operators, e.g. the equivalence between dividing by five and multiplying by a fifth, and the outcome of divisions, e.g. understanding 3/4 = ¾. This understanding is used to solve problems in different contexts, including measures and statistics. The expectation is that children of all ages appropriately choose and use number facts, understanding of place value and different methods (starting with counting and mental methods and developing into mental and written methods), explaining their decision making and justifying their solutions.

Geometric Reasoning – this theme is about all aspects of understanding shape and space and includes application of understanding of number and calculation. The focus is on understanding properties of shapes and the relationship between them, using this understanding to solve problems including problems related to measures (perimeter, area and volume), and understanding movement within space. The expectation is that children of all ages appropriately choose and use facts and understanding, explaining their decision making and justifying their solutions.Measures and statistics are included throughout as contexts for number sense, additive reasoning and multiplicative reasoning. Algebra, which appears as a new domain in Year 6, is the introduction of “the use of symbols and letters to represent variables and unknowns in mathematical situations that [pupils] already understand,” and therefore appears in all four themes as part of generalisation of mathematical understanding.”

Reception Parent Leaflet

Progression in Addition and Subtraction Phase One

Progression in Addition and Subtraction Phase Two

Progression in Addition and Subtraction Phase Three

Progression in Multiplication and Division Phase One

Progression in Multiplication and Division Phase Two

Progression in Multiplication and Division Phase Three

 

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